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The Tuxedo Etiquette: What to do and What to avoid.

  • FASHION
  • Thursday, 29 Dec, 2022
  • 4847
The tuxedo etiquette

For formal events like a wedding, a christening, or a graduation, "occasion wear" becomes a more important category of clothing. Even though they are a little more casual, the traditional attires, especially those in dark and solid colours, are a good option; yet, tuxedos, by virtue of their form and origin, have always been the appropriate choice for the extremely important events.

It is true that weddings are one of the rare opportunities during the whole year to show off the perfectly polished black-tie appearance, but if we must admit merely for the sake of tradition and a bit out of respect for etiquettes, we Italians are not huge supporters of tuxedos as a wedding suit.

Wearing a tuxedo to a formal event does not guarantee that you will look refined and elegant; in fact, there are a few guidelines that should be adhered to in order to ensure that your black-tie outfit is flawless.

Get ready to turn attention with these pointers on when to wear a tuxedo, where to wear a tuxedo, and how to wear a tuxedo.

Story of the tuxedo: what makes a tux a tux?

The history of the tailless "smoking jacket" is the key to deciphering the roots of the tuxedo. After supper, gentlemen in 17th century England may don a smoking jacket and retire to a den or smoking chamber.

In reality, the original function of the jacket was to protect the women's evening wear from ashes and the offensive odour of tobacco.

The Prince of Wales, later known as Edward VII, had his tailor Henry Poole make him a short blue evening jacket in 1865 so that he could wear it on casual nights at his country home, Sandringham.

In the end, the English "evening jacket" (or dinner suit) and the American "tuxedo" both trace their ancestry back to this attempt (because of its original word spread starting from the homonymous village of Tuxedo Park).

When to wear a tuxedo

The tuxedo has been the gold standard of formalwear ever since it was first created. This sophisticated attire was originally designed to serve as an alternative to the all-day suit, enabling men to shed the grime and odour of a day spent riding.

A tuxedo is the quintessential evening clothing, symbolising the aspiration of those with a strong social orientation to look their best at high-spirited gatherings and parties. Even when the widespread use of the vehicle rendered this custom obsolete, people continued to observe it.

Before World War II, tuxedos with tails were still the norm for formal events. Tuxedos were formerly worn to both formal and casual events, but after World War II, the classic suit or work suit became more popular in the latter setting.

Never before evening..?

No of the formality level of the event, tuxedos are always inappropriate for daytime events. Due of the rule's impracticality in the summer, especially in sunny climates, etiquette experts have come up with additional clear-cut recommendations.

The standard is to use time as a boundary between day and night, with tuxedos not being appropriate before 6 o'clock. In contrast, the worldwide standard specifies that dusk begins at 6 p.m. or when darkness falls, whichever occurs first, allowing for wider variation across the planet's latitudes.

Unless you're a waiter, the only times you should put on a tuxedo throughout the day are at formal nighttime events or official diplomatic activities.

…even before evening

The morning coat, a daytime alternative to the tuxedo, is still often worn in Britain, a nation where the culture of reserving the tuxedo for formal occasions scheduled after 18.00 has been retained.

Morning coats and other forms of daytime formalwear have all but gone in the United States (and many other nations) after the end of World War II. In its place, the tuxedo has come to be seen as "formal clothing" for any occasion, and it is now often worn throughout the day.

This has led to the tuxedo being seen more as an essential piece of clothing for men to own than as something to be rented for special occasions only, and its rightful usage in the evenings is now mostly restricted to the wealthy.

How to wear a tuxedo

Black tie events, such as weddings and theatre premieres, demand a certain kind of formal dress called "black tie," which can only be fulfilled by donning a tuxedo and a traditional black silk bow tie.

What additional considerations should one make before donning a tuxedo, though? Follow these guidelines to choose the perfect dress and complementing accessories.

The jacket? Single-breasted and with adaptable lapels

The most typical lapel styles for a tuxedo jacket are shawl and peaked.

There should be no vents in the back or extra buttons on the tuxedo jacket. Lapels? Just a peak or a shawl, nothing more.

The two- or three-button jackets that are more common in the workplace are, on the other hand, too informal for this setting.

Remember that welt pockets are more professional than flap pockets and should be your first choice when selecting a jacket.

The colour: blue, black or ivory

The most typical lapel styles for a tuxedo jacket are shawl and peaked.

There should be no vents in the back or extra buttons on the tuxedo jacket. Lapels? Just a peak or a shawl, nothing more.

The two- or three-button jackets that are more common in the workplace are, on the other hand, too informal for this setting.

Remember that welt pockets are more professional than flap pockets and should be your first choice when selecting a jacket.

Wear a shirt with a wingtip collar

What a black bow tie looks like with a white shirt with a wingtip collar and a tuxedo.

It should go without saying that a black bow tie and a white shirt with a wingtip collar are required attire.

Black-tie attire requires a white shirt with a tuxedo collar, which may be customised. This collar style, which is meant to be worn with a bow tie, goes by the name "wingtip" because of its distinctive front wings.

The cuffs, which must be double cuffs (turned up on themselves) and have a buttonhole for attaching cufflinks, are an important customization to keep in mind.

Black bow tie in silk

You mean the bow tie? Silky black. The tailcoat looks great with the white bow tie. Throw away your tie for once.

Trousers with braces

Belts, although functional, are inappropriate for a black tie event, so it's best to choose for a pair of pants that may be worn with braces instead.

Pick fabric braces in black or white to complement your tuxedo's colour rather than leather ones.

Finally, lapel or pleated pants are not appropriate attire for this event.

Choose appropriate shoes and socks

Black or matte lace-up shoes are recommended. The key is to avoid wearing shoes with too many embellishments, although in this situation, even embroidered slippers would suffice.

The socks are expected to reach the kneecap and be black. It's impossible to find an alternative that will have the same effect.

Details

Throw on the vest if your jacket has peak lapels and the satin cummerbund if yours has shawl collars. The tuxedo may be personalised with satin or twill trim on the lapels and the traditional side band.

At last, a white linen or cotton pocket square is a fine finishing touch. While crimson or burgundy silk pocket squares are popular choices, any man may appear dapper in his own way with just a little ingenuity.


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